INVESTIGATIONS


recordsTheo’s passion is holding government officials accountable. He’s questioned mayors about illegal spending and questionable hiring — he once had a car door slammed into his arm by a mayor trying to flee. He is a proud defender of journalists’ rights. Several times, he has objected to the closing of governmental meetings in violation of open meetings laws.

▼”I wouldn’t do an interview with you or anyone from FOX6 if my life depended on it,” said Milwaukee County Sheriff Clarke said after the county began a probe into a harassment complaint against the controversial sheriff. In 2017, the sheriff has taken issue with my records requests and questions about his activity.

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▼I discovered that Matt Bevin, the Republican candidate for Kentucky governor, had been late to pay his property taxes multiple times. After a second story revealed even more problems, Bevin claimed I was working for his opponent.

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▼A tip and multiple open records requests revealed shady dealings at city hall in one of Louisville’s suburbs, and a mayor less than excited to talk about it. The story led to multiple follow-ups.

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▼With unrest in Ferguson, Mo., I went through military surplus logs to find local law enforcement agencies had bought hundreds of cast-off military items, including armored trucks and body armor.

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▼Working off a tip, I discovered that Bullitt County dispatchers had mishandled three 911 calls in a month, mistakenly sending the wrong first responders to the emergency. In one of the cases, a teenager died.

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▼I used surveillance and extensive records requests to reveal the true problem behind a slum housing problem in West Louisville — tracking down city officials and landlords to get answers.

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▼A month of records requests and chasing down public officials led to a story about problematic pasts for nearly half of one local city’s police officers. I followed up after discovering that the department’s second-in-command also had faced trouble.

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▼Madison officials made banning problem panhandlers a focus in 2012, with one city alderwoman telling me they could make $30 an hour to spend on drugs and booze. We went undercover to find panhandling in Madison can be more lucrative than the jobs of many people who donated. The story won a 2013 regional Edward R. Murrow award.

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